Critics’ Picks: Oct 14 - Oct 20, 2016

Los Angeles Times entertainment, arts and culture critics choose the week’s most noteworthy openings, new releases, ongoing events and places to go in and around Southern California.

This week filmmaker Terrence Malick fills the big Imax screen with “Voyage of Time,” and a favorite Laurel and Hardy movie locale is celebrated in Silver Lake.

Click through to explore more, and, where applicable, find directions to venues.

Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy starred in "The Music Box" (1932).

The Music Box’

Numerous iconic film locations exist in Los Angeles, places like the Griffith Park Observatory, beloved of fans of “Rebel Without a Cause.” But for sheer joy, it’s hard to top a certain 133 steps in the Silver Lake area. As all fans of Laurel & Hardy know, those stairs were the site of the classic 1932 Oscar-winning short “The Music Box,” a one-of-a-kind effort showcasing the hard time these two had moving a piano on that unforgiving terrain. Celebrate that film and those guys at the 22nd annual Music Box Steps Day, at Laurel & Hardy Park, just across the street from those stairs in Silver Lake. In addition to showings of the film, there will be free food, live music, a magic show, a raffle and even Laurel & Hardy lookalikes. In other words, fun for all. Saturday between noon and 4 p.m. Read more

Laurel & Hardy Park, 900 Vendome Street in Silver Lake.

Kenneth Turan

Film critic

A still from "Voyage of Time: The Imax Experience." (Imax)

Voyage of Time: The Imax Experience’

Elaborating on the creation sequence from “The Tree of Life,” Terrence Malick delivers a glorious cosmic reverie, full of visually stunning ideas of what the origins of the universe and life on Earth may have looked like. Read more

Justin Chang

Los Angeles Times Movie Critic

Shaden Kanboura in "Sand Storm." (Vered Adir)

Sand Storm’

Winner of six Israeli Oscars, including best picture, this urgent family drama, as tense as any thriller, is set not in familiar territory but inside that country’s insular Bedouin community. Read more

Kenneth Turan

Film critic

Sasha Lane. (A24)

American Honey’

This wild, unruly and astonishingly beautiful fourth feature from “Fish Tank” director Andrea Arnold earns its 162-minute running time as it follows a teenager (startling newcomer Sasha Lane) who embraces the thrill and adventure of the open road. Read more

Justin Chang

Los Angeles Times Movie Critic

Ava DuVernay, director of "The 13th." (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)


Offering a brisk, cogently argued alternative to conventionally taught American history, Ava DuVernay’s powerful, persuasive documentary systematically covers a century and a half of race relations in this country. Read more

Kenneth Turan

Film critic

Other recommendations:

'The Age of Shadows'

Kim Jee-woon (mildly) tones down the ultra-violence of “I Saw the Devil” with this thrillingly taut and intricate 1920s spy yarn, which will represent South Korea in the Oscar race for best foreign-language film. (In Korean with English subtitles) Read more

Café Society

Woody Allen’s new film, starring Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart and Steve Carell, is, of course, funny, but it also ends up, almost without our realizing it, trafficking in memory, regret and the fate of relationships in a world of romantic melancholy. Read more

'Hunt for the Wilderpeople'

This wonderful New Zealand film has a gently absurdist quality, a simultaneously sweet and subversive sensibility all its own, mixing warmth, adventure and comedy in ways that consistently surprise. Don’t miss it. Read more


Indignation Adapted by director James Schamus from the Philip Roth novel and starring Logan Lerman and Sarah Gadon, this is a melancholy, star-crossed romance laced with Roth’s piercing sense of humor.  Read more

'Jason Bourne'

The fourth film to feature Matt Damon as the unstoppable secret agent, the third to be directed by Paul Greengrass, this most propulsive motion picture is a model of what mainstream entertainment can be like when everything goes right.  Read more

'Kubo and the Two Strings'

In this 3-D wonderment steeped in ancient Japanese folklore and brought to life by the stop-motion innovators at Laika Entertainment, magic is both an eye-popping phenomenon and an everyday reality. Read more

'Pete’s Dragon'

A straight-ahead, unapologetic family film, this re-imagining of the 1977 film about a boy and his dragon is the kind of foursquare movie its distributor Disney could have made decades ago. Read more

Angela Sarafyan in "Westworld." (HBO)

2016 Fall TV Season

The fall TV season is here, and between the many options delivered by premium cable channels, multiple streaming services and a new slate of shows from the major networks, there’s a lot of programming to choose from. If you were hoping that that “Peak TV” bubble was going to burst anytime soon, allowing you a moment to do something other than watch television, you can disabuse yourself of that notion tout de suite. It’s TV all the time now, and like the Hydra of legend, every show that’s canceled seems to sprout three in its place. Worse luck, many are excellent — so you’re sunk. Here, we run down what to watch this season as they debut weekly. Read more

Robert Lloyd

Television critic

Lena Headey in "Game of Thrones." (HBO / AP)

Beyond the Buzz, a World of Good TV

Winter may be here, but fall is still coming, and you might need to catch up with spring. No, I’m not talking about climate change, or at least not the meteorological sort, I’m talking about television. For a while, it was the new novel, then the new restaurant. Now TV is the new weather — we talk about it constantly, and with increasing emphasis on the unusual and the extreme. Lamentations over the extra-long wait for the next season of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” bump up against memes from Netflix’s “Stranger Things”; consternation over the second season of Lifetime’s “UnREAL” briefly interrupts speculation about who Negan killed in the season finale of AMC’s “The Walking Dead.” Meanwhile, a whole new slate of brand new shows looms in the distance, already crackling with terms like “hotly anticipated,” “if you only watch one” and “biggest of the fall.” In other words, the bottled lightning known as buzz. Read more

Mary McNamara

Television critic

Other recommendations:

Binge watching options

Life in the digital age means it's never too late to catch up on all those shows you've been hearing so much about, and there's no better time than summer. To aid in this endeavor, I have compiled a shortlist, which is (a) completely, and even randomly, subjective, and (b) specific to the notion of the beach-binge, i.e., at least two seasons are or soon will be available. As often as possible, I have chosen series that transport American viewers to another place and/or time. So in no particular order, a list that is limited, subjective, specific and not to be confused with a list of the best TV shows of all time. Just the ones you might want to consider hanging out with this summer. Read more

Nija Okoro and Jason Dirden. (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’

Phylicia Rashad, who staged a powerful revival of Wilson’s “Joe Turner’s Come and Gone” at the Taper in 2013, is an actor’s director. Her production of Wilson’s first play to make it to Broadway shines a light on the complicated humanity of the characters and creates the ensemble unity that is necessary in a work that centers on a recording session of blues singer Ma Rainey (lusciously played by Lillias White) but takes in so much more of the early 20th century African American experience. Ends Sun., Oct. 16. Read more

Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., L.A.

Charles McNulty

Theater critic

Other recommendations:

'Walking the Tightrope'

Poised between children’s fable and adult reverie, 24th Street Theater’s pitch-perfect 2013 staging of Mike Kenny’s perceptive take on the eternal cycle — as artfully simple, theatrically poetic and deeply affecting a chamber piece as any in recent memory — returns for a limited engagement, an indelible must-see for all ages. (David C. Nichols) (Ends Sun., Oct. 16) Read more

Samueli Theater, Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa

'Walking the Tightrope'

Poised between children’s fable and adult reverie, 24th Street Theater’s pitch-perfect 2013 staging of Mike Kenny’s perceptive take on the eternal cycle — as artfully simple, theatrically poetic and deeply affecting a chamber piece as any in recent memory — returns for a limited engagement, an indelible must-see for all ages. (David C. Nichols) (Ends Sun., Oct. 16) Read more

Samueli Theater, Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa

‘Dutch Masters’

Mounting suspense, artful plot twists and razor-sharp performances transform an awkward subway encounter into an impeccably rendered microcosm of broken race relations, shaping intractable underlying assumptions, expectations, and resentments into compelling human drama. (Philip Brandes) (Ends Sun., Oct. 16) Read more

Rogue Machine at the Met Theatre, 1089 N. Oxford Ave., L.A.


Tom Stoppard’s dizzying blend of philosophy, physics, higher mathematics and even higher comedy requires diligent parsing throughout its nearly three-hour running time. For those fortunate enough to experience Geoff Elliott’s inspired staging at A Noise Within, that mental diligence will prove no chore. Consistently deemed one of the best plays of the 20th Century, Stoppard's intellectual peregrinations demand agility and intelligence from any would-be interpreters. Fortunately, Elliott and his superb cast are more than up to the task in this cogent production, which straddles the line between chaos and determinism, comedy and tragedy, life and, of course, death – that ever-present specter always lurking on the periphery of Stoppard’s masterpiece. (F. Kathleen Foley) (Ends Nov. 20) Read more

A Noise Within, 3352 E. Foothill Blvd., Pasadena

‘The Eccentricities of a Nightingale’

Tennessee Williams preferred his 1951 revision of “Summer and Smoke” to its predecessor, and the delicate amalgam of pathos and poetry mined by director Dana Jackson and her proficient cast raises a persuasive argument for Williams’ viewpoint, with the transcendent Ginna Carter beyond praise as spinster Alma Winemiller. A richly atmospheric, emotionally rewarding revival. (David C. Nichols) (Ends Oct. 29) Read more

Pacific Resident Theatre, 703 Venice Blvd., Venice

Maxx Morando, left, Genessa Gariano , Lydia Night and Sage Nicole. (Jen Rosenstein)

Single: ‘A Living Human Girl’

Out of the gate, teen band the Regrettes aren’t holding back. The group’s first major single, “A Living Human Girl,” takes aim at the patriarchy in one verse and societal expectations of beauty in another, with lead singer Lydia Night rattling off perceived faults as if they’re cause for celebration. Pimples? Check. Stretch marks? Bring ‘em on. “I can dress how I want, not looking for a show of hands,” she snarls over a snappy, ‘60s-inspired groove. Although the 15-year-old says the song was inspired by her first few days of high school in downtown Los Angeles, the tune’s worldview transcends adolescence. Read more

Todd Martens

Video game critic

Beyonce. (Parkwood Entertainment)

The Best Pop Music of 2016 (so far)

So much about the first few months of pop in 2016 has been about mourning. David Bowie, Glenn Frey, Merle Haggard, Paul Kantner, George Martin, Prince, Scotty Moore, Maurice White, Bernie Worrell and the just-starting-out Christina Grimmie are among those who have left us. But while the music community has been dealt serious blows, the first six months of 2016 have also given us much to celebrate. What follows is a look at some of the most notable albums and singles of 2016, as picked by the pop staff of The Times. There are plenty of recognizable names — and one artist has made such an impact she’s listed twice — but the emphasis here is on those who may have been overlooked. Happy listening. Read more

Pop Music Staff

Los Angeles Times Pop Music Staff

Paul Simon. (Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

Album: ‘Stranger to Stranger’

Sound is the theme of this album,” Paul Simon writes in the press notes accompanying this new album, “as much as it’s about the subjects of the individual songs. If people get that, I’ll be pleased.” True to his word, the visceral sonic qualities of the 11 tracks on the collection are as commanding as his ever-literate lyrics and consistently inviting melodies. Yet this is nothing new for one of the premiere singers and songwriters of the rock era. At 74, Simon reaches ever further for new textures, musically and sonically, to help him say what he wants to say, making “Stranger to Stranger” a distinguished and captivating extension of, rather than a dramatic departure from, his rich body of work. It’s a work reflective of an artist still hungry for exploration. Read more

Randy Lewis


Other recommendations:

Album: 'Take Me to the Alley'

Last year Gregory Porter told me that "Holding On," his sleek, skittering collaboration with the British dance duo Disclosure, started out as a bare-bones piano ballad. Given how much I'd thought of Porter's fine 2013 album, "Liquid Spirit," this was something I had to hear. Now I can: A handsome, slow-and-low rendition of "Holding On" — not merely unplugged, but with different chords that alter the vibe of the song — opens Porter's new record, "Take Me to the Alley," due Friday. The tune's placement on the album speaks to the importance of "Holding On" in Porter's career, the way it put this Southern California native in front of unfamiliar listeners after years of hard work in jazz clubs and on Broadway. Read more

Album: 'Everything You've Come to Expect'

In the music video for "Aviation," the first song on their new album as the Last Shadow Puppets, Alex Turner and Miles Kane play two men forced to dig what look like their own graves by a suave but sadistic crime-boss type. There's a woman too, weeping in the back seat of a vintage Rolls-Royce, and we seem meant to understand that she's been caught carrying on with one of these guys; now her wicked husband is punishing the whole lot. Whatever the specifics, Turner and Kane — both Jason Statham-soulful in their grimy undershirts — are clearly identified as the noble victims in this little drama. Yet that's rarely what they look like on "Everything You've Come to Expect," the second full-length from this British orchestral-pop duo. Due Friday, the album comes nearly a decade after the Last Shadow Puppets' swooning 2008 debut, "The Age of the Understatement." Read more

Album: 'Mind of Mine'

A year after Zayn Malik quit One Direction (which likely led to the remaining four band members hitting pause), this 23-year-old singer has become the first of the bunch to release a solo record. And listening to "Mind of Mine," due Friday, it seems clear that Zayn left not because he couldn't handle the pressure of global stardom, as he intimated at the time, but because he wanted to get serious — really serious — about music. Read more

Album: 'This Is What the Truth Feels Like'

Sixteen years ago, Gwen Stefani of No Doubt sang about wanting "a simple kind of life." That's not how things turned out. Sure, No Doubt — the Anaheim ska-pop band that blasted off in 1995 with the zillion-selling album "Tragic Kingdom" — continued its straightforward ascent for a few more years, racking up hit songs with impressive efficiency through the mid-2000s. But then Stefani launched a solo career that added new wrinkles to her sound and persona. She went into fashion and starting having children, which she's said made a mess of her schedule. Following two huge solo records, she returned to No Doubt for a reunion album, 2012's "Push and Shove," which quickly fizzled, disrupting a narrative neatly defined to that point by success. Then last year, her life got really screwy: Stefani's marriage to Gavin Rossdale, frontman of the band Bush, fell apart (reportedly because of his affair with the couple's nanny), and she began dating Blake Shelton, the country star with whom she recently appeared on NBC's "The Voice." "Never thought this would happen ... Don't know what I'm feeling," she sings in "Used to Love You," a moody, down-tempo single released only months after she filed for divorce. Stefani dives deeply into those complications on her first solo album in a decade. Due Friday, "This Is What the Truth Feels Like" has songs about betrayal and disappointment, and songs about moving on from a broken relationship and falling in love again. Read more

Album: 'Anti'

You can't name your album "Anti" without inviting your audience to think about what you oppose. So what is Rihanna standing against on her eighth studio record? A smoothly choreographed product rollout, for one. After repeated delays, "Anti" finally appeared online Wednesday night, first in an apparently unauthorized leak, then as an exclusive on the streaming service Tidal; Samsung also gave away a limited number of free downloads through a complicated promotion. By Friday, the album was available for sale through iTunes (where it quickly topped the chart) and Tidal, though it hasn't yet shown up on other streaming services such as Spotify, and a physical release date has yet to be announced. (Mikael Wood) Read more

Album: 'Blackstar'

There's something delightfully perverse that David Bowie waited until he was 69 to release what's being described as his first jazz album. It was at that age too when veteran rock stars who include Rod Stewart and Paul McCartney took up with big bands or reached for the Great American Songbook to demonstrate their taste and hard-won stature. Even Bob Dylan got in on the act last year with "Shadows in the Night," his lovely (if desolate) tribute to Frank Sinatra. So when you hear that Bowie hooked up with a New York saxophonist and his crew for “Blackstar,” out Friday (just two days before his death from cancer), you think perhaps that Bowie has joined the club — that after cycling through countless styles and personas over his half-century career, he’s finally become a finger-snapping crooner with Count Basie on his mind. Ah, no. Read more

Album: 'HitNRun Phase Two'

Is this becoming a habit? That's the question Prince raised Saturday morning when without warning he released a new album, "HitNRun Phase Two," on the streaming-music service Tidal. As its title suggests, the 12-track set follows an earlier album, "HitNRun Phase One," which Prince had made available in similar fashion in September — proof, it would seem, that this legendary control freak has shed his once-famous disdain for the unruly Internet. Maybe this double-shot system is how Prince, as prolific as he's ever been, intends to roll from here on out. Works for me. A proudly organic companion to the EDM-inflected "Phase One," Prince's latest album shows that he hasn't lost his interest in (or his knack for) the creeping funk and lush R&B balladry he was making in the early 1990s on records like the great "Diamonds and Pearls." Read more

Album: '25'

When Adele sings on her new album, "25," about an emotional experience so vivid that "It was just like a movie / It was just like a song," she's probably thinking of a tune by one of her idols: Roberta Flack, say, or Stevie Nicks. But for fans of this 27-year-old British singer, such a moment could only be captured by one thing: an Adele song. With her big hair and bigger voice, Adele broke out in 2008 as part of the British retro-soul craze that also included Duffy and Amy Winehouse. Her debut album, "19," spawned a hit single in "Chasing Pavements" and led to a Grammy Award for best new artist. Yet she outgrew any style or scene with the smash follow-up, "21," which presented Adele as a great crystallizer of complicated feelings, an artist writing intimately about her own life (in this case about a devastating breakup) in a way that somehow made the music feel universal. Clearly, the pressure is on to duplicate that commercial success with "25," which comes after a long period of public quiet in which Adele recovered from throat surgery and gave birth to a son (and tweeted no more than a few dozen times). "Hello," the record's brooding lead single, set a record when it was released last month, racking up 1.1 million downloads in a week. But the song's enthusiastic embrace only underscored the other, more pressing demand on the singer as she returns: that her music still provide its trademark catharsis. Put another way, Adele's fans have been waiting for years for new Adele songs to explain their experiences to them. And they get a worthy batch on "25." Read more

Album: 'Bob Dylan — The Cutting Edge'

Among the many things Thomas Edison famously said, he remarked that "Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration," and he also insisted that "I have not failed once. I have simply found 10,000 ways that do not work." Both precepts are clearly evident in "1965-1966: Bootleg Series Vol. 12," the revelatory latest release of Dylan archival recordings that comes out Nov. 6. Culling a mind- and ear-boggling wealth of outtakes, alternate versions and rehearsal snippets during sessions over the 14 months of an astonishingly fertile period for Dylan, which yielded three of the most influential albums in rock history — "Bringing It All Back Home," "Highway 61 Revisited" and "Blonde on Blonde" — the new set throws open a panoramic window into the creative process of one of the 20th century's greatest artists. (Randy Lewis) Read more

(Mariah Tauger / For The Times)

Gus’s Fried Chicken

You’re probably going to want to try Gus’s Fried Chicken. Because it’s pretty remarkable stuff, even in chicken-obsessed Los Angeles: a burnished red-gold, pieces bigger than they are small, whose peppery heat at first seems mild, even nonexistent, until it starts creeping up a few bites in, a heat that makes you glad you have a pint of sweet iced tea by your side. You may be thinking of Nashville hot chicken, the kind you can stand in line for at Howlin’ Ray’s in Chinatown, but this isn’t that — you don’t worry whether you’ve renewed your life insurance after a wing or two, and the crunch, although considerable, is of a completely different sort. Classic Nashville chicken has a complex, multilayered crunch that maintains much of its integrity even after a day or two in the fridge. Gus’s chicken is more of a batter-fried phenomenon, with a thin, fragile crust that shatters under your teeth, releasing a flood of scalding juice. Read more

Gus’s Fried Chicken, 1262 Crenshaw Blvd., Los Angeles

Jonathan Gold

Restaurant critic

Merry's House of Chicken. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Favorite Asian fried chicken joints

Does Los Angeles live by Nashville hot chicken alone? No — not as long as there’s a universe of Asian fried chicken too. Read more

Jonathan Gold

Restaurant critic

Other recommendations:

Kettle Black

Kettle Black is a new Italian restaurant from Beau Laughlin and his team, who also own Sawyer and the juice bar Clover on the block. The chef is Sydney Hunter III, who has been cooking in Los Angeles for 15 years or so, many of them at the right hand of Ludovic Lefebvre. Hunter’s Italian cooking is sure but eccentric, hewing to no particular regional cuisine and slightly edgy in its way, favoring a sweet-sour flavor palette, lots of crunch, and chiles used as much for fragrance as they are for heat: pizza, good handmade pastas, and fat purple slices of Japanese eggplant passed through the fire just long enough to add a bit of smokiness. Read more

Kettle Black, 3705 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles

Tempura Endo

There has never been a tempura restaurant in Los Angeles quite like Tempura Endo, the first American branch of a Kyoto, Japan, institution that dates to 1910. The restaurant occupies a modest storefront next door to a Japanese knife shop and right by a rental car yard. The location, although it is in the Beverly Hills triangle, has never been noted for fine dining – I remember a sushi bar that seemed really to specialize in sukiyaki. Tempura Endo is the other kind of tempura bar – an exquisitely expensive place that exists to serve intricate omakase dinners, well-calibrated multi-course meals presented with the detail and attention to seasonality of kaiseki, the lightness and purity you might not associate with two hours of deep-fried food. Read more

Tempura Endo, 9777 S. Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills

Pok Pok

Is it possible to become converted in a single bite? Because with a single fried chicken wing at the original Portland Pok Pok in 2007, I dropped my prejudices about non-European cooking in Oregon, the crossover potential of extreme Asian funk, and the ability of a non-Thai to prepare anything like upcountry Thai food. So eight years, many affiliated restaurants, a James Beard award, a Michelin star and a Chinatown noodle stand later, here we are at Pok Pok Los Angeles, an enormous restaurant in the old Fu Ling space in the Mandarin Plaza at the relatively deserted north end of Chinatown. Chef Andy Ricker's gift is the ability to make Thai food seem new again, to take it out of that comfortable place in the suburban strip mall, where it has become the default takeout comfort food for a huge chunk of Los Angeles, and put it back into the roadside stands and rural villages of Northern Thailand. Read more

Pok Pok, 978 N. Broadway, Los Angeles

Five of the tastiest Chinese restaurants in the SGV with the name 'Tasty'

In last week's column, I alluded to the flood of San Gabriel Valley Chinese restaurants with the word "Tasty'" tucked somewhere into their English-language names. Depending on whether you count doughnut shops, burger stands or branches of the same restaurant as Tasty, Not-Tasty or Tasty in their own right – well, there are a lot of them. Here are five of the tastiest. Read more

Valerie Jaudon. (Christopher Knight / Los Angeles Times)

Valerie Jaudon: Ways and Means

A dozen Pattern and Decoration paintings from the last three years at Von Lintel Gallery show Jaudon working at top form. They employ her familiar motif of wide but intricate two-dimensional interlaces painted in oil on linen. A seeming simplicity gets more complex the longer you look. Through Oct. 29. Read more

Von Lintel Gallery, 2685 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles

Christopher Knight

Art critic

Henry Taylor installation. (Joshua White / Blum & Poe Gallery)

Henry Taylor With a New Film by Kahill Joseph

Eleven large paintings are included in an ambitious exhibition at Blum & Poe gallery. The figures are ordinary folks doing ordinary things — getting their hair done, floating in a swimming pool, even just sitting for a portrait to be painted. Yet they feel momentous, vital — which seems to be the point. Through Nov. 5. Read more

Blum & Poe, 2727 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles

Christopher Knight

Art critic

Other recommendations:

Alternative Dreams: 17th Century Chinese Paintings From the Tsao Family Collection

With Dong Qichang’s own scholarly acumen as a guide, the collection Tsao assembled unfolds the widespread influence the artist gained as the Qing dynasty consolidated its power. The work of more than 80 artists is on view in a handsome, minimalist installation. It’s a demanding show, one that defies casual perusal. But it rewards close looking. Through Dec. 4. Read more

LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles

Carina Brandes: Remote Control

In her memorable first Los Angeles appearance, the Berlin-based photographer uses mostly herself as a model, but individual identity isn’t what matters in these raw sketches of improvisatory theater. The actions performed, one step above primal, suggest conditions — yearning, mischief, concealment. The pictures feel cinematic, but their strange potency comes from being disjunctive, stills without a before or an after. (Leah Ollman) (Ends Sun., Oct. 23) Read more

Team (bungalow), 306 Windward Ave., Venice

Hanne Darboven

One of the many confounding aspects of Darboven’s work is how such a cerebral enterprise can also be so physically, even viscerally, affecting. Three projects by the late German artist fill every wall here, top to bottom, with individually framed pages of notations and photographs aligned in a continuous, immersive grid. Darboven’s permutations are fascinating efforts to get inside of time, inside of knowledge. For all of its minimalist coolness, the work can make the heart ache and the body sigh. (Leah Ollman) (Through Oct. 29) Read more

Sprüth Magers, 5900 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles

Toba Khedoori

Nothing rests easily in Khedoori's work, its drama typically tamped down — even in a romantic, wall-size painting of billowing black clouds. They hang in the air, a pregnant pause, quietly setting a stage for something momentous to happen. Khedoori starts with a primary paradox of art, in which an image is also an object. Playing with contradictions intrinsic to Modernist painting, she comes up with enchanting, unexpected hybrids. Read more Through March 19.

LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles

Rodney McMillian

The artist’s latest exhibition is perfect for election season. At its center is an installation that delves into the legacy (or lack thereof) of Shirley Chisholm, the first African American female presidential candidate. It’s a welcome reminder of how far we have not come. (Sharon Mizota) (Ends Fri., Oct. 15) Read more

Susanne Vielmetter, 6006 Washington Blvd., Los Angeles

Ry Rocklen: Los Angeles Relics

There is a seemingly alchemical magic to Rocklen’s sculptures. The process by which one thing becomes or reveals another is a central theme of the Los Angeles artist’s recent work. (Sharon Mizota) (Through Oct. 29) Read more

Honor Fraser, 2622 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles


The small exhibition is an elegiac tone poem, spoken in visual shades of black. With just 10 works by eight artists, it presents no defined thesis but resonates beyond its modest scale. (Christopher Knight) (Through March 31, 2017) Read more

The Underground Museum, 3508 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles

"No Man's Sky." (Hello Games / AP)

No Man’s Sky’

Fourteen minutes and 54 seconds. I’m on a distant planet, and I need to get to my spaceship. Yet “No Man’s Sky” is telling me that the vessel is a 14-minute, 54-second hike away. So I settle into the couch. But after three minutes of strolling through a salmon-colored rocky surface — and admiring some lavender plant life — I need a break, perhaps for good. This was the second time in one week I had quit “No Man’s Sky.” That’s because there’s another, more important number to mention when it comes to discussing “No Man’s Sky”: 18.4 quintillion. That is, there are more than 18.4 quintillion planets to discover in “No Man’s Sky.” You will not live long enough — here on Earth, that is — to collect them all. Read more

Todd Martens

Video game critic


There are peculiar stone structures in the shape of sharks throughout the game “Abzu.” They exist not to be investigated or warn of foreboding territory ahead. Instead, these objects are built for meditating. Have a seat, they beckon, and take in marine life. Play voyeur to a whale, a jellyfish, a shark or any number of undersea inhabitants. While “Abzu” is far from a documentary or a simulation, perhaps no other video game has ever been so singularly focused on re-creating the vast, majestic and mysterious nature of an aquatic universe. It does this with no voice, no text and no conflict. Your character in “Abzu” cannot “die” in the traditional video-game sense. Instead, the game centers on postcard-worthy imagery — swarming, silver schools of fish or sparkling green leaves or warm, orange coral — and Austin Wintory’s thoughtful, patient score. Read more

Todd Martens

Video game critic

Other recommendations:

'Mirror's Edge Catalyst'

Imagine if the world were filtered through the home screen of a smartphone. Picture opening your eyes to an image overloaded with headlines and messages. Notifications no longer buzz, they flash before you. "Warning," the display blinks in the lower right, "your bank balance is low." This is the view of Faith, early in "Mirror's Edge Catalyst." Having just been released from prison, Faith may not be happy with her financial prospects, but she definitely isn't too keen with the sensory overload of this futuristic, uncomfortably modern society. "Is this what the employees see all the time?" she wonders. In the world of "Mirror's Edge Catalyst," there aren't citizens so much as employees — workers for one of a handful of conglomerates that controls the world. You are identified not by your ethnicity or your interests but your job. Read more

'The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds'

Another long-standing Nintendo franchise gets spruced up. Like "Mario 3D," the look and controls are familiar, the tone is entirely new, as this action-adventure emphasizes smarts and exploration over tedious dungeon crawling. Read more


Early in the game "Severed," one of the more striking images you'll see this year in a video game appears. A woman of mixed-race descent stands before a mirror, her yellow dress bloody, her arm a stub and her eyes wide in shock. The world is bright and blocky — a handcrafted-looking universe that seems constructed of paper, but immediately the tone drifts toward melancholic. The art almost appears lifted from a Día de los Muertos display, and though this is the beginning of the journey for young Sasha, it also feels like the beginning of an end. Read more

'Late Shift'

Early in the film "Late Shift," Matt, a student on his way to a night job, faces an easily relatable dilemma: help a lost tourist with directions and risk being late to work or ignore the man and hop on a waiting subway train. Here is where you would expect director Tobias Weber to show the audience the outcome of Matt's decision as the story unfolds. Matt's choice, however, is up to you, the viewer. In fact, you control every major plot turn in the film. "Late Shift," created by CtrlMovie, a small studio in Switzerland, and written by Weber and Michael Robert Johnson, best known for Guy Ritchie's "Sherlock Holmes," may be the world's first fully realized choose-your-own-adventure film. Read more

Wizarding World of Harry Potter Hollywood

The opening of Universal Studios' new Wizarding World of Harry Potter Hollywood brings to the West Coast what many consider the grandest theme park attraction in North America. A mix of fully realized sets — including a steamy, fire-breathing dragon — as well as screens interspersed with actors from the "Harry Potter" films, Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey is a highly kinetic motion simulator that aims to re-create the sense of flying. Guests sit on what appears to be a bench, pull down an over-the-shoulder harness and are soon whisked into the air, gliding in and out of filmed moments and elaborately constructed scenes. Read more

Universal Studios Hollywood, 100 Universal City Plaza, Universal City

A Few New Mobile Video Games

There are a lot of mobile games out there — last year more than 100,000 iOS games were released in North America. Here are a few recent mobile games worthy of exploration: "Love You to Bits" (Alike/Pati). Breakups stink. They're worse when your girlfriend is scattered around the galaxy. In this iOS game a young boy tries to put back together his first love, a female robot, and learns to live on his own along the way. "Story Warriors: Fairy Tales" (Below the Game). Tales such as "Snow White," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Cinderella" and more get remixed in this text-driven puzzler about a young woman who gets trapped in folklore. Tap on words to bring them to life, and piece together nouns and adjectives as if they're math problems, the right solution inspiring a cutesy animated sequence. "SPL-T" (Simogo). Swedish studio Simogo is one of the most adventurous companies out there, specializing in head-scratching, text-heavy games such as "Device 6" and "The Sailor's Dream." "SPL-T" is a back-to-basics puzzle game. In the black and white game, players place a horizontal line and then a vertical one, trying to create as many splits as possible. "Super Phantom Cat" (Veewo). Cats! Robots! "Super Phantom Cat" takes the weirdness of "Super Mario Bros.," gives it a zany feline-meets-sci-fi makeover, and uses slick touch controls to create a freshly retro experience. It's all delivered with a gooey feel-good message and some rainbow-hued prettiness. "The Swords." (Sunhead Games). Imagine a scene in an action movie, one in which one swordsman is surrounded by an army on all sides. Now imagine all the action is presented in a minimal ink wash art style. By zeroing in on the blades, "The Swords" emphasizes the chaos of battle. Swipe fast, and do so with precision. Read more

'Rocket League'

Dave Hagewood didn't set out to create the next big thing in electronic sports. Ten years ago he simply envisioned a game in which cars did crazy things. Cars with rockets on them. The result was the breakout independent game of 2015, "Rocket League." The key to its success was one simple addition to Hagewood's original vision: a giant, bouncy soccer ball. Thus, a zany game in which cars crashed into one another became something else entirely, a madcap sport. "Rocket League" has now reached more than 12 million players, with revenue topping $70 million. In late February, the game — already a hit on Sony's PlayStation 4 and computing platform Steam — arrived on Microsoft's Xbox One, where in less than a month it attracted more than 1 million players. Read more

Svetlana Alexievich. (Markus Schreiber / AP)

Zinky Boys: Soviet Voices From the Afghanistan War’

I perceive the world through the medium of human voices,” Svetlana Alexievich declares near the end of “Zinky Boys: Soviet Voices From the Afghanistan War,” explaining both her method and her point of view. For Alexievich — who in October became just the third nonfiction writer and 14th woman to receive the Nobel Prize in literature — testimony may be as close as one can get to faith. “We’ve worshipped many gods,” she writes in this slender but vivid account, told in the voices of survivors of the Soviet Afghan war. “Some have been consigned to the scrapheap, others to museums. Let us make Truth into a god! A god before whom each of us shall answer according to his own conscience, and not as a class, or a university year, or a collective, or a people….” Read more

David Ulin

Book critic

Other recommendations:

'The Bazaar of Bad Dreams'

Stephen King, I've come to think, is at his most adept when writing in the midlength range. His big novels — "The Stand," "It," "11/22/63" — have always felt a little baggy to me, while his shortest work (he has published more than 200 stories, gathered in a number of collections) can feel sketchy, more idea than nuanced narrative. That middle zone, however: His finest efforts emerge from this territory, shorter novels "Misery," "Joyland" and "The Shining," novellas such as "The Body" or the chilling "A Good Marriage." In this material, King has the breadth to do what he does best, which is to evoke the very human underpinnings of terror, while also remaining constrained by certain limitations of space. As he explains in "The Bazaar of Bad Dreams," which gathers 20 pieces of fiction, along with brief reflections on their composition, "Only through fiction can we think about the unthinkable, and perhaps obtain some sort of closure." The key word there is not the unthinkable in which King traffics but "closure," the closure of the midrange form. Read more

'Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink'

New wave rocker, country crooner, balladeer, collaborator and showman: Elvis Costello has been all of these and more in the course of what is now a 40-year run. Of all the first-generation punkers, he remains (with Patti Smith and possibly David Byrne) among the few who can claim the longevity and diversity of, say, Bob Dylan or Joni Mitchell, both of whom appear in this book. Like minds, perhaps, or water seeking its level. Either way, this is the company to which Costello belongs. And yet, if "Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink" has anything to tell us, it is that its author remains a fan. Here he is, for instance, on his first experience singing with Paul McCartney, a rehearsal duet on "All My Loving": "I locked on to the vocal harmony the second time around, as I'd done a thousand times before while singing along to the record. It never really occurred to me that learning to sing either vocal part on a Beatles record was any kind of musical education. I was just a kid singing along with the radio in our front room." Or this, recalling a good-natured cutting contest, trading lyrics with Bob Dylan: "It was just fun to be in the ring with the champ for a minute or two." Read more

'City on Fire'

A long book represents an act of faith. On the writer's part, to be sure: The faith that he or she has something to say that's worth all the hours it will take for us to hear it, that it won't dissolve in ephemera and flash. But on the reader's part, also: The faith that we can trust the writer, that there will be a payoff, that it will add up. Certainly, this is the challenge faced by Garth Risk Hallberg's first novel, "City on Fire," which, clocking in at more than 900 pages, seeks to re-create, in panoramic fashion, the New York City of the late 1970s. Hallberg's book, of course, is much anticipated, for its length, its scope and its deal (he sold the book for $2 million) — but all of that is beside the point. The only criteria worth considering is whether, or how, the narrative works, the extent to which it draws us in. Read more


First, let's clear up a misconception: Patti Smith's "M Train" is not a sequel to her 2010 National Book Award-winning memoir "Just Kids." In fact, "M Train" is not a memoir at all, except in the loosest sense — a book of days, a year in the life, a series of reflections, more vignettes than sustained narrative. By saying that, I don't mean to be critical, for vignettes are what Smith does best. Read more

'So You Don't Get Lost in the Neighborhood'

Patrick Modiano opens his most recent novel, "So You Don't Get Lost in the Neighborhood," with an epigraph from Stendhal: "I cannot provide the reality of events, I can only convey their shadow." It's an almost perfect evocation of the book, not to mention Modiano's career. The French writer, who won the Nobel Prize last year for a body of work as deft and beautiful as any in postwar European literature, is an excavator of memory — not only his own or those of his characters (many of whom bear, as J.D. Salinger once observed of his fictional alter ego Seymour Glass, "a striking resemblance to — alley oop, I'm afraid — myself"), but also that of Paris. That's why his fiction resonates so deeply; it occupies an elusive middle ground between place and personality. Read more

'Bad Sex'

Among my favorite aspects of Clancy Martin's second novel, "Bad Sex," is that it is not about bad sex; in fact, the sex is relentless, passionate. Rather, it is about all the bad stuff sex — or sexual obsession — can make us do. Narrated by Brett, a recovering alcoholic who betrays her sobriety, and her marriage, for a yearlong affair with her husband's banker Eduard, the book records the spiral, the ripple effect, of transgressive behavior, the way that once we slip the bounds of propriety, it can be ever more difficult to find a passage back. Read more

(Monica Wang Photography)


Just in time for the holiday shopping season, a new boutique has opened on Robertson Boulevard marrying East and West Coast style. Reservoir is the concept of New York City transplants Aliza Neidich and Alissa Jacob and features a well-edited mix of clothing, accessories and home goods with an easy sophistication made for L.A., including Ryan Roche hand-knit sweaters, Denis Colomb ponchos, Ellery sleek crepe dresses and tops, Solid and Striped denim jumpsuits, Madeworn tees, Newbark shearling slides, Dosa patchwork totes and Wendy Nichol fringed leather bucket bags. Read more

Reservoir, 154 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles

Booth Moore

Fashion critic

Other recommendations:

'Sporting Guide: Los Angeles, 1897'

With famed film mogul Sam Goldwyn as her grandfather, Liz Goldwyn's family name is practically synonymous with old-school Hollywood glamour. But it's Los Angeles before it became the capital of the motion picture industry that's the subject of the style maven's new book, "Sporting Guide: Los Angeles, 1897" (Regan Arts). The work of historical fiction looks back on the city's seedier past, with loosely connected stories about the madams, prostitutes, orphans, hustlers and tramps who roamed Alameda, Los Angeles and Spring streets. I chatted with Goldwyn about what drew her to this time period in L.A., her impressions of the book's rough characters, and what role women had in a culture where prostitution was tolerated. Read more

'Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe'

Ladies, the next time you are teetering on high heels, you can blame men. But not for the reason you think. In Western fashion, high heels were popularized by men, starting in the court of Louis XIV where a talon rouge (red heel), identified a member of the privileged class centuries before Christian Louboutin made red soles the calling card of his luxury shoe brand. That's just one of the tasty tidbits in "Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe," an exhibition scheduled to run through Dec. 13 at the Palm Springs Art Museum that examines the fashion accessory we all love to hate, including its history, its relation to gender identity, sex appeal and power. Read more

Palm Springs Art Museum, 101 Museum Drive, Palm Springs