Critics’ Picks: May 13 - May 19, 2016

Los Angeles Times entertainment, arts and culture critics choose the week’s most noteworthy openings, new releases, ongoing events and places to go in and around Southern California.

On stage, “The Golden Dragon” explores multi-cultural globalization in a fast food restaurant. And at the movies, “Viva” explores transgender issues in Havana.

Click through to explore more and, where applicable, find directions to venues.

Hector Medina. (Magnolia Pictures)

Viva’

Emotional and effective, this is a torch-song melodrama convincingly set in the specific world of Havana’s drag performers even though it’s written and directed by a pair of Irishmen, Mark O’Halloran and Paddy Breathnach, respectively. Read more

Kenneth Turan

Film critic

Hannah Arendt. (Hannah Arendt Archive / Zeitgeist Films)

“Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt”

A thoughtful, nuanced examination of a complex political philosopher whose willingness to challenge certainties lent her thoughts on totalitarianism and refugees a force and originality that make them surprisingly relevant today. Read more

Kenneth Turan

Film critic

Neel Sethi. (Disney / AP)

The Jungle Book’

By turns sweetly amusing and scarily unnerving, crammed with story, song and computer-generated visual splendors, this revisiting of the old Rudyard Kipling tales aims to be a model of modern crowd-pleasing entertainment. (Kenneth Turan) Read more

Kenneth Turan

Film critic

Other recommendations:

'Hail, Caesar!'

A droll Coen brothers tribute to and spoof of Hollywood past that amuses from beginning to end with its site specific re-creation of the studio system and the movies that made it famous. Read more

'Midnight Special'

A Michael Shannon-starring drama that announces the arrival of Jeff Nichols as a filmmaker in total control of his technique as well as our emotions. A bravura science fiction thriller that explores emotional areas like parenthood and the nature of belief, it's a riveting genre exercise as well as something more. Read more

'Streit's: Matzo and the American Dream'

This lively and engaged documentary uses the story of the paradigmatic matzo manufacturer to examine what the American dream meant back in the day and what it has turned into now. Read more

Tawny Newsome, Drew Tarver and Ryan Gaul. (Seeso)

Bajillion Dollar Properties’

This spot-on mocking of a Bravo-style serve-the-rich workplace reality series comes to you from Seeso, NBCUniversal’s relatively new all-comedy subscription service. Here, Paul F. Tompkins plays a high-end Los Angeles real estate mogul who declares to his brokers that he has decided to make one of them a partner, precipitating aggressive competition among an already aggressively competitive staff. Created by Kulap Vilaysack (Nurse Kulap on “Childrens Hospital”), the show is semi-scripted — like reality television itself, one might say — which works or it doesn’t from moment to moment and line to line but lends the series an authentic air of uncertainty, of its characters not knowing exactly what they’re going to say. The performances run from the as-good-as-real to Tompkins’ lordly, velvet-jacketed chairman, who seems to believe that he has invented real estate — “The idea of buying and selling bits of the earth, can you imagine the hubris? And yet, here we will stand.” Seeso, anytime. Read more

Robert Lloyd

Television critic

Johnny Depp as Trump. (FunnyorDie.com / AP)

Funny or Die Presents Donald Trump’s The Art of the Deal: The Movie’

Former “Onion” Editor Joe Randazzo wrote this hour-long sketch about the future Republican front-runner’s younger days. It stars a prosthetically altered, barely recognizable Johnny Depp as Donald Trump in what purports to be Trump’s own TV-movie adaptation of his memoir “The Art of the Deal,” supposedly preempted from its original scheduled airing by a football game and subsequently — in the words of Ron Howard, who introduces it — “thought to be lost in the Cybill Shepherd blouse fire of 1989.” (It later “turned up at a yard sale in Phoenix, Arizona,” says Howard. “I had to physically wrestle it from a nice woman named Jennie.”) Director Jeremy Konner, who also directs “Drunk History,” knows some things about re-creating a past world on a budget. It is not meant to be a perfect pastiche — the characters use words that could not be spoken on television then, they exhibit a knowledge of future events; Trump, who sometimes doesn’t understand references in a script he supposedly wrote himself, assesses his own performance, as himself, as Oscar worthy. Funny or Die. Read more

Robert Lloyd

Television critic

Other recommendations:

Prince on YouTube

Oh, Prince, Prince the unpronounceable, the artist, "The Artist," the Artist Formerly and Always Known as Prince, the Purple One, the man of many names and not-names, of many hairstyles and high heels, who wore his influences on his billowing sleeves yet made them all his own. He is gone, unbelievably, awfullly, and the world turns to the Internet to find — not much. Under the quite accurate claim that the Internet routinely deprives artists of income, encouraging a wider culture of digital shoplifting, Prince and his representatives kept and apparently will continue to keep a close watch on his intellectual property, with the result that the global video-sharing that constitutes how we grieve now has been short-circuited; besides having no officially available video of "When Doves Cry" or "Thieves in the Temple" to repost, you may also find that that low-res clip you linked to last night of Prince performing "Purple Rain" at First Avenue, has been blocked by the morning. But Prince was an internationally famous performer in an age of television, and he left traces in the ether; you can't erase them all. Here are some (as of this writing) surviving clips, not all of them musical, to get you through the sad days between denial and acceptance. YouTube, anytime. Read more

'Detectorists' Season 2

The second season of Mackenzie Crook's brilliant and beautiful pastoral comedy is now available on Acorn TV, almost your one-stop shopping center for British television, and it is just as well-wrought, funny, touching and lovely to behold as the first (which is now available via Netflix and Hulu). Crook, who was Gareth on the original British "The Office," Ragetti in "Pirates of the Caribbean" and Orell on "Game of Thrones," writes, directs and stars as Andy, a change-averse fellow who spends much of his free time, of which he has a lot, having no regular employment, with his friend Lance (Toby Jones), walking the fields and meadows with metal detectors in search of Saxon gold but pulling up mostly pull tabs and musket balls. Acorn TV, anytime. Read more

'Washington D.C. Live Bald Eagle Cam'

Live from a relatively remote corner of the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C., two 24-hour cams focus on the nest of the mated bald eagles known since 2014, when they first arrived, as Mr. President and the First Lady. One egg hatched Wednesday; a second is expected to hatch this weekend. It's as if, as national birds, they're trying to remind the body impolitic that there's more to this country than the weird noises emanating from the current presidential campaign, halls of Congress, etc., something that predates and hopefully will survive human fecklessness. (Still, it was people who put these cameras up; there may be hope for us yet.) ( www.DCEagleCam.eagles.org, anytime) (Robert Lloyd) Read more

Ann Colby Stocking and Joseph Kamal. (Ed Krieger)

‘The Golden Dragon’

German playwright Roland Schimmelpfennig’s drama, set in and around a “Chinese-Thai-Vietnamese” fast-food restaurant in an unnamed city, makes visible what globalization would rather conceal and exploit. In another of co-artistic director Michael Michetti’s inspired ensemble productions at the Theatre @ Boston Court, five performers slip in and out of roles without regard for race, gender, age or any other category. In this dark contemporary fluid fable, the universe is gleaned in a white takeout carton. Ends Sunday, June 5. Read more

Boston Court, 70 N. Mentor Ave., Pasadena

Charles McNulty

Theater critic

Alan Mandell, left, and Barry McGovern. (Craig Schwartz)

‘Endgame’

Playing Hamm opposite the Clov of Irish actor Barry McGovern, his partner in the 2012 Taper production of “Waiting for Godot,” Alan Mandell redeems a lifetime of experience in his staging of “Endgame,” the best rendering of Samuel Beckett’s masterpiece I’ve encountered. Mandell brings more than just respect for the text. He brings a musical awareness of the language and a tonal assurance that can shift on a dime from mordant irony to delicate feeling. Ends Sunday, May 22. Read more

Kirk Douglas Theatre, 9820 Washington Blvd., Culver City

Charles McNulty

Theater critic

Sameerah Luqmaan-Harris and Sterling K. Brown in “Father Comes Home From the Wars.” (Craig Schwartz)

‘Father Comes Home From the Wars (Part 1, 2 & 3)’

“The Odyssey” looms large in Suzan-Lori Parks’ entrancingly intimate, anachronistically frolicsome Civil War drama. But no need to brush up on your Homer to appreciate the panoramic playwriting here. Parks cycles through genres with postmodern impunity, evoking classics not to make academic points but to set the stage for an epic journey — the journey of a black slave seeking his liberty as history slowly pivots. Directed with majestic fluidity by Jo Bonney, the production stars a deeply affecting Sterling K. Brown in the central role of Hero, whose master promises him his freedom if he joins him on the battlefield in the fight against the North. Ends Sunday, May 15. Read more

Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., L.A.

Charles McNulty

Theater critic

Other recommendations:

‘Honky’

Deftly skewering platitudes and self-delusions surrounding racial identity in our advertising-driven society, this sharply written, smartly performed satire manages to be simultaneously thoughtful and laugh-out-loud-funny. (Philip Brandes) (Ends Sunday, July 17) Read more

Rogue Machine at the Met Theatre, 1089 N. Oxford Ave., L.A.

‘Dry Land’

Not for the faint of heart, Ruby Rae Spiegel's play about the effects of an unwanted pregnancy on a tough but terrified teenage girl and her lonely new friend receives a taut and harrowing staging from director Alana Dietze and features precociously perfect performances by Teagan Rose and Connor Kelly-Eiding as high school swim teammates bonding in a time of confusion and crisis. Despite the occasional dramaturgical blunder, the sheer psychic clout of this visceral and important play should not be underestimated. You may flinch — but you will be unable to look away. (F. Kathleen Foley) (Ends Saturday, May 28)

Atwater Village Theatre, 3269 Casitas Ave., L.A.

‘You Never Can Tell’

This buoyant, beautifully appointed take on George Bernard Shaw's early comedy is a textbook study in sprightly Shavian playing. Director Stephanie Shroyer understands that the secret to landing the ornate verbiage and ideological content is a light touch and absolute conviction of delivery. Her wonderful cast follows suit. The results, both elegant and tickling, are as definitive as we are likely to see any time soon. (David C. Nichols) (Ends Sunday, May 15) Read more

A Noise Within, 3352 E. Foothill Blvd., Pasadena

'Man Covets Bird'

The 24th Street Theatre follows up last year's award-winning “Walking the Tightrope” with another play for families that touches on struggle and loss, “Man Covets Bird,” by the Australian playwright Finegan Kruckemeyer. If the storyline is a bit poetic and meandering, the performers are winsome and the production elements (including live music as well as charming, cartoony video projections) are beautifully designed. Both children 7 and up and adults will find something to enjoy in the experience. (Margaret Gray) (Ends Sunday, May 15) Read more

24th Street Theatre, 1117 W. 24th St., L.A.

Gregory Porter. (Andy Sheppard / Redferns / Getty Images)

Album: ‘Take Me to the Alley’

Last year Gregory Porter told me that “Holding On,” his sleek, skittering collaboration with the British dance duo Disclosure, started out as a bare-bones piano ballad. Given how much I’d thought of Porter’s fine 2013 album, “Liquid Spirit,” this was something I had to hear. Now I can: A handsome, slow-and-low rendition of “Holding On” — not merely unplugged, but with different chords that alter the vibe of the song — opens Porter’s new record, “Take Me to the Alley,” due Friday. The tune’s placement on the album speaks to the importance of “Holding On” in Porter’s career, the way it put this Southern California native in front of unfamiliar listeners after years of hard work in jazz clubs and on Broadway. Read more

Mikael Wood

Pop Music Writer

From the CD cover. (Domino Recording / AP)

Album: ‘Everything You’ve Come to Expect’

In the music video for “Aviation,” the first song on their new album as the Last Shadow Puppets, Alex Turner and Miles Kane play two men forced to dig what look like their own graves by a suave but sadistic crime-boss type. There’s a woman too, weeping in the back seat of a vintage Rolls-Royce, and we seem meant to understand that she’s been caught carrying on with one of these guys; now her wicked husband is punishing the whole lot. Whatever the specifics, Turner and Kane — both Jason Statham-soulful in their grimy undershirts — are clearly identified as the noble victims in this little drama. Yet that’s rarely what they look like on “Everything You’ve Come to Expect,” the second full-length from this British orchestral-pop duo. Due Friday, the album comes nearly a decade after the Last Shadow Puppets’ swooning 2008 debut, “The Age of the Understatement.” Read more

Mikael Wood

Pop Music Writer

Zayn Malik. (John Salangsang / Invision / AP)

Album: ‘Mind of Mine’

A year after Zayn Malik quit One Direction (which likely led to the remaining four band members hitting pause), this 23-year-old singer has become the first of the bunch to release a solo record. And listening to “Mind of Mine,” due Friday, it seems clear that Zayn left not because he couldn’t handle the pressure of global stardom, as he intimated at the time, but because he wanted to get serious — really serious — about music. Read more

Mikael Wood

Pop Music Writer

Other recommendations:

Album: 'This Is What the Truth Feels Like'

Sixteen years ago, Gwen Stefani of No Doubt sang about wanting "a simple kind of life." That's not how things turned out. Sure, No Doubt — the Anaheim ska-pop band that blasted off in 1995 with the zillion-selling album "Tragic Kingdom" — continued its straightforward ascent for a few more years, racking up hit songs with impressive efficiency through the mid-2000s. But then Stefani launched a solo career that added new wrinkles to her sound and persona. She went into fashion and starting having children, which she's said made a mess of her schedule. Following two huge solo records, she returned to No Doubt for a reunion album, 2012's "Push and Shove," which quickly fizzled, disrupting a narrative neatly defined to that point by success. Then last year, her life got really screwy: Stefani's marriage to Gavin Rossdale, frontman of the band Bush, fell apart (reportedly because of his affair with the couple's nanny), and she began dating Blake Shelton, the country star with whom she recently appeared on NBC's "The Voice." "Never thought this would happen ... Don't know what I'm feeling," she sings in "Used to Love You," a moody, down-tempo single released only months after she filed for divorce. Stefani dives deeply into those complications on her first solo album in a decade. Due Friday, "This Is What the Truth Feels Like" has songs about betrayal and disappointment, and songs about moving on from a broken relationship and falling in love again. Read more

Album: 'Anti'

You can't name your album "Anti" without inviting your audience to think about what you oppose. So what is Rihanna standing against on her eighth studio record? A smoothly choreographed product rollout, for one. After repeated delays, "Anti" finally appeared online Wednesday night, first in an apparently unauthorized leak, then as an exclusive on the streaming service Tidal; Samsung also gave away a limited number of free downloads through a complicated promotion. By Friday, the album was available for sale through iTunes (where it quickly topped the chart) and Tidal, though it hasn't yet shown up on other streaming services such as Spotify, and a physical release date has yet to be announced. (Mikael Wood) Read more

Album: 'Blackstar'

There's something delightfully perverse that David Bowie waited until he was 69 to release what's being described as his first jazz album. It was at that age too when veteran rock stars who include Rod Stewart and Paul McCartney took up with big bands or reached for the Great American Songbook to demonstrate their taste and hard-won stature. Even Bob Dylan got in on the act last year with "Shadows in the Night," his lovely (if desolate) tribute to Frank Sinatra. So when you hear that Bowie hooked up with a New York saxophonist and his crew for “Blackstar,” out Friday (just two days before his death from cancer), you think perhaps that Bowie has joined the club — that after cycling through countless styles and personas over his half-century career, he’s finally become a finger-snapping crooner with Count Basie on his mind. Ah, no. Read more

Album: 'HitNRun Phase Two'

Is this becoming a habit? That's the question Prince raised Saturday morning when without warning he released a new album, "HitNRun Phase Two," on the streaming-music service Tidal. As its title suggests, the 12-track set follows an earlier album, "HitNRun Phase One," which Prince had made available in similar fashion in September — proof, it would seem, that this legendary control freak has shed his once-famous disdain for the unruly Internet. Maybe this double-shot system is how Prince, as prolific as he's ever been, intends to roll from here on out. Works for me. A proudly organic companion to the EDM-inflected "Phase One," Prince's latest album shows that he hasn't lost his interest in (or his knack for) the creeping funk and lush R&B balladry he was making in the early 1990s on records like the great "Diamonds and Pearls." Read more

Album: '25'

When Adele sings on her new album, "25," about an emotional experience so vivid that "It was just like a movie / It was just like a song," she's probably thinking of a tune by one of her idols: Roberta Flack, say, or Stevie Nicks. But for fans of this 27-year-old British singer, such a moment could only be captured by one thing: an Adele song. With her big hair and bigger voice, Adele broke out in 2008 as part of the British retro-soul craze that also included Duffy and Amy Winehouse. Her debut album, "19," spawned a hit single in "Chasing Pavements" and led to a Grammy Award for best new artist. Yet she outgrew any style or scene with the smash follow-up, "21," which presented Adele as a great crystallizer of complicated feelings, an artist writing intimately about her own life (in this case about a devastating breakup) in a way that somehow made the music feel universal. Clearly, the pressure is on to duplicate that commercial success with "25," which comes after a long period of public quiet in which Adele recovered from throat surgery and gave birth to a son (and tweeted no more than a few dozen times). "Hello," the record's brooding lead single, set a record when it was released last month, racking up 1.1 million downloads in a week. But the song's enthusiastic embrace only underscored the other, more pressing demand on the singer as she returns: that her music still provide its trademark catharsis. Put another way, Adele's fans have been waiting for years for new Adele songs to explain their experiences to them. And they get a worthy batch on "25." Read more

Album: 'Bob Dylan — The Cutting Edge'

Among the many things Thomas Edison famously said, he remarked that "Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration," and he also insisted that "I have not failed once. I have simply found 10,000 ways that do not work." Both precepts are clearly evident in "1965-1966: Bootleg Series Vol. 12," the revelatory latest release of Dylan archival recordings that comes out Nov. 6. Culling a mind- and ear-boggling wealth of outtakes, alternate versions and rehearsal snippets during sessions over the 14 months of an astonishingly fertile period for Dylan, which yielded three of the most influential albums in rock history — "Bringing It All Back Home," "Highway 61 Revisited" and "Blonde on Blonde" — the new set throws open a panoramic window into the creative process of one of the 20th century's greatest artists. (Randy Lewis) Read more

(Cheryl A. Guerrero/ Los Angeles Times)

Nersses Vanak

It is cold in Los Angeles. Rain is in the air. What you want to be eating is dizi, an Iranian lamb and chickpea stew, flavored with turmeric and dried lime — a popular street food dish from Tehran that seems to have a tonic effect against the chill. And for dizi, you should probably be at Nersses Vanak, a slightly faded restaurant in an industrial district of Glendale, where dizi, served with long-pickled garlic, platters of fresh herbs, and hot slabs of flatbread snatched smoking from the grill, is always the thing. Read more

Nersses Vanak, 6524 San Fernando Road, Glendale

Jonathan Gold

Restaurant critic

Other recommendations:

10 best dishes of 2015

A decade or two from now, when line-caught sea bass will seem as rare and unobtainable as sturgeon caviar is now, drive-through windows sell more lentil bowls than cheeseburgers and we have gotten used to the idea of Taylor Swift as the governor of Pennsylvania, 2015 may well seem in retrospect a fairly important year in Los Angeles restaurants. Menus just seemed to be mostly vegetarian without anybody talking about it much, and even French chefs began to talk among themselves about the primacy of Mexican cooking. The differences between high and low cuisine, which had started to crumble as far back as the 1980s, were utterly annihilated. Exotic fermentation techniques began to creep out of the lab. The idea of abolishing the practice of tipping took hold. And as always, there were 10 dishes that attempted to encapsulate it all. Read more

Jonathan Gold's 101 Best Restaurants, 2015

Your next great meal in Southern California is as likely to come from that tiny storefront next to the 7-Eleven as it is from a Beverly Hills gastronomic palace. Los Angeles, which is both where American ideas about food tend to be formulated and where they come back eventually to die, can be a spectacular place to eat. Read more

Pok Pok

Is it possible to become converted in a single bite? Because with a single fried chicken wing at the original Portland Pok Pok in 2007, I dropped my prejudices about non-European cooking in Oregon, the crossover potential of extreme Asian funk, and the ability of a non-Thai to prepare anything like upcountry Thai food. So eight years, many affiliated restaurants, a James Beard award, a Michelin star and a Chinatown noodle stand later, here we are at Pok Pok Los Angeles, an enormous restaurant in the old Fu Ling space in the Mandarin Plaza at the relatively deserted north end of Chinatown. Chef Andy Ricker's gift is the ability to make Thai food seem new again, to take it out of that comfortable place in the suburban strip mall, where it has become the default takeout comfort food for a huge chunk of Los Angeles, and put it back into the roadside stands and rural villages of Northern Thailand. Read more

Pok Pok, 978 N. Broadway, Los Angeles

Five of the tastiest Chinese restaurants in the SGV with the name 'Tasty'

In last week's column, I alluded to the flood of San Gabriel Valley Chinese restaurants with the word "Tasty'" tucked somewhere into their English-language names. Depending on whether you count doughnut shops, burger stands or branches of the same restaurant as Tasty, Not-Tasty or Tasty in their own right – well, there are a lot of them. Here are five of the tastiest. Read more

Christopher Knight/Los Angeles Times

George Condo: ‘Entrance to the Void’

Condo has always been besotted with pushing paint around canvas, ever since his first show in Los Angeles more than 30 years ago. The pleasure is infectious. The New York-based painter is still smitten. Most of the 11 bracing paintings, all from the last two years, start in modern Spain. Goya and Picasso are launching pads for Condo’s irresistible scribbling. Ends Saturday, June 11. Read more

Sprüth Magers Gallery, 5900 Wilshire Blvd.

Christopher Knight

Art critic

Brian Ridley and Lyle Heeter (Robert Mapplethorpe)

Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Medium

Without classic 1960s Pop art, especially Andy Warhol’s, there would be no Robert Mapplethorpe photographs as we know them from the 1970s and 1980s. That’s the big takeaway from a visit to this impressive two-museum exhibition (The Getty Center and Los Angeles County Museum of Art). Ends Sun., July 31. Read more

The Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles

Christopher Knight

Art critic

(Museum Associates / LACMA)

Agnes Martin

Want to clear your mind? Get a pickup truck, then spend a couple years driving across and around the continent — alone. That’s the first lesson of this lovely retrospective of abstract paintings. The show is divided in two, early work and late work, and the separation between them was launched by her decision to make an extended cross-country sojourn. In stripped-down canvases, Martin created an entirely distinct, largely unprecedented artistic vocabulary for spiritual consciousness. (Christopher Knight) (Ends Monday, Sept. 12) Read more

LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles

Christopher Knight

Art critic

(Marilyn Minter / Orange County Museum of Art)

Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty

Orange Crush,” “Green Pink Caviar,” “Blue Poles,” “Smash” – Minter’s best work pumps up the volume of glossy commercial advertisements to billboard dimensions. The colors are lush, the tactile surfaces shiny and the swirl of moist, organic forms orgiastic. Visually they’re exhausting. That’s a benefit. When you slow down to catch your breath, you begin to see a lot. (Christopher Knight) (Ends Sun., July 10) Read more

Orange County Museum of Art, 850 San Clemente Drive, Newport Beach

Christopher Knight

Art critic

J. Paul Getty Museum

Roman Mosaics Across the Empire’

Combat. Conflict. Life or death skirmishes. Brawling. Judging from the admittedly small sample of nearly a dozen fragments of floor mosaics, several quite large, in a new exhibition at the Getty Villa, ancient Romans across the sprawling empire were pretty obsessed with the bloody violence necessary to sustaining their imperial position around the vast expanse of the Mediterranean. (Christopher Knight) (Ends Monday, Sept. 12) Read more

Getty Villa, 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades

Christopher Knight

Art critic

Other recommendations:

Laurie Lipton: 'Techno Rococo'

This selection of Lipton's large drawings in pencil and charcoal is a feast of toxic confections. Every lavishly-detailed scene straddles the seduction/repulsion divide. Each visual spectacle registers some aspect of societal decay. Much of the Los Angeles-based artist's work reads as a parable of the here and now, and pokes at the contradictions inherent in our device-dependent lives (Leah Ollman) (Through June 30) Read more

Ace Gallery, 5514 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles

Kim Abeles: Portraits and Autobiographies

Abeles has been poking at the material residue of identity and extensions of the self for nearly 40 years, in tandem with her work relating to broader social and environmental concerns. This show thoughtfully surveys the more introspective strand of the Los Angeles artist's spirited practice. (Leah Ollman) (Through May 21) Read more

PØST, 1206 Maple Ave. #515, Los Angeles

Group Show: All Right

Take the bravado of Peter Voulkos, John Mason, et al, fast forward two generations, cross the gender line, and what do you get? This invigorating show will give you a hugely satisfying, necessarily partial answer in its assembly of 16 female sculptors working in clay. (Leah Ollman) (Through May 21) Read more

Redling Fine Art, 6757 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles

Scott Anderson: Supper Club

The artist's eight new paintings are not particularly attractive. Ugly colors, cluttered compositions and ham-fisted paint-handling make for works in which rudimentary images burble up from unsettled backgrounds awhirl with undigested restlessness. Anderson's oils on canvas are also intellectually sophisticated, physiologically complex and psychologically ambivalent (David Pagel) (Through May 14) Read more

CES Gallery, 711 Mateo St., Los Angeles

Ezra Johnson

In Johnson's stop-motion animations, each iteration of a painted canvas becomes a filmed frame. The magnetically compelling works are driven by the momentum of their own ceaseless making. With a shaggy, restless style, Johnson holds the eye and snags the soul. (Leah Ollman) (Through June 3) Read more

Young Projects at Pacific Design Center, 8687 Melrose Ave., B230, Los Angeles

Erasing, Tracing, Racing Paint: Polly Apfelbaum & Dona Nelson

During the last 10 years an approach to art-making has been gathering force and gaining traction. It's called Deserted Island Abstraction, and its ethos is vividly displayed in one of the best two-person exhibitions to be staged recently. One glance at the wickedly wonderful stews of stuff each artist works with makes it clear that the two New Yorkers would paint and sculpt even if they were shipwrecked and had to scavenge for supplies on a deserted island. (David Pagel) (Through May 7) Read more

Michael Benevento Gallery, 3712 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles

Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933-1957

The fit is ideal: A large and absorbing exhibition analyzes a legendary school that had a profound influence on the emergence of the midcentury American avant garde, and it opens in the city now known for a proliferation of first-rate art schools that have had a profound influence on the shape of late 20th and early 21st century international art. "Leap" offers an engrossing bit of back story to where we are today. Ends May 15. Read more

Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd

The Ocular Bowl: Alex Olson, Agnes Pelton, Linda Stark

Mystery whispers through all of the works in this group exhibition. Its Realism is magical, a matter of making connections — and fostering relationships — between ordinarily overlooked intuitions and the things from which they spring (David Pagel) (May 28) Read more

Kayne Griffin Corcoran, 1201 S. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles

'Making Waves: Japanese American Photography, 1920-1940'

One of the most fascinating chapters in American art from the first half of the 20th century is also among the least known. An absorbing, must-see exhibition goes far in bringing the episode back into long-awaited view. Simply put: Issei photographers, most of whom immigrated to Los Angeles from Japan while still in their teens, went on to make some of the most adventurous avant-garde photographs in the years between the two World Wars. (Christopher Knight) (Through June 26) Read more

Japanese American National Museum, 100 N. Central Ave., Los Angele

'Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women'

Sometimes the seemingly simple act of occupying space can be a radical, profoundly political act. Space invasion is the savvy artistic subject of the fine inaugural exhibition at the sixth outpost for the Zurich-based Hauser & Wirth, which also has powerhouse galleries in London and New York. (Ends Sun. Sept. 4. Read more

Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, 901 E. Third St., Los Angeles

Keith Sonnier

The artist calls his new wall drawings in neon, wire and electrical transformers "portals," and their design motifs and titles do refer to forms from ancient Roman and medieval architecture, often ecclesiastical. Elegant and deceptively simple, they display a masterful hand. Through May 7. Read more

Maccarone Gallery, 300 S. Mission Road, Los Angeles

Lily Stockman: Pollinator

The artist's strikingly simple geometric abstractions possess a mysterious confidence. Her softly curved lozenges, U-shapes and circles, rendered in a mostly muted palette of grays, yellows and pinks, refer to 1970s feminist abstraction but also feel strangely unique (Sharon Mizota) (Through May 7)

Gavlak, 1034 N. Highland Ave., Los Angeles

Svetlana Alexievich. (Markus Schreiber / AP)

Zinky Boys: Soviet Voices From the Afghanistan War’

I perceive the world through the medium of human voices,” Svetlana Alexievich declares near the end of “Zinky Boys: Soviet Voices From the Afghanistan War,” explaining both her method and her point of view. For Alexievich — who in October became just the third nonfiction writer and 14th woman to receive the Nobel Prize in literature — testimony may be as close as one can get to faith. “We’ve worshipped many gods,” she writes in this slender but vivid account, told in the voices of survivors of the Soviet Afghan war. “Some have been consigned to the scrapheap, others to museums. Let us make Truth into a god! A god before whom each of us shall answer according to his own conscience, and not as a class, or a university year, or a collective, or a people….” Read more

David Ulin

Book critic

Other recommendations:

'The Bazaar of Bad Dreams'

Stephen King, I've come to think, is at his most adept when writing in the midlength range. His big novels — "The Stand," "It," "11/22/63" — have always felt a little baggy to me, while his shortest work (he has published more than 200 stories, gathered in a number of collections) can feel sketchy, more idea than nuanced narrative. That middle zone, however: His finest efforts emerge from this territory, shorter novels "Misery," "Joyland" and "The Shining," novellas such as "The Body" or the chilling "A Good Marriage." In this material, King has the breadth to do what he does best, which is to evoke the very human underpinnings of terror, while also remaining constrained by certain limitations of space. As he explains in "The Bazaar of Bad Dreams," which gathers 20 pieces of fiction, along with brief reflections on their composition, "Only through fiction can we think about the unthinkable, and perhaps obtain some sort of closure." The key word there is not the unthinkable in which King traffics but "closure," the closure of the midrange form. Read more

'Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink'

New wave rocker, country crooner, balladeer, collaborator and showman: Elvis Costello has been all of these and more in the course of what is now a 40-year run. Of all the first-generation punkers, he remains (with Patti Smith and possibly David Byrne) among the few who can claim the longevity and diversity of, say, Bob Dylan or Joni Mitchell, both of whom appear in this book. Like minds, perhaps, or water seeking its level. Either way, this is the company to which Costello belongs. And yet, if "Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink" has anything to tell us, it is that its author remains a fan. Here he is, for instance, on his first experience singing with Paul McCartney, a rehearsal duet on "All My Loving": "I locked on to the vocal harmony the second time around, as I'd done a thousand times before while singing along to the record. It never really occurred to me that learning to sing either vocal part on a Beatles record was any kind of musical education. I was just a kid singing along with the radio in our front room." Or this, recalling a good-natured cutting contest, trading lyrics with Bob Dylan: "It was just fun to be in the ring with the champ for a minute or two." Read more

'City on Fire'

A long book represents an act of faith. On the writer's part, to be sure: The faith that he or she has something to say that's worth all the hours it will take for us to hear it, that it won't dissolve in ephemera and flash. But on the reader's part, also: The faith that we can trust the writer, that there will be a payoff, that it will add up. Certainly, this is the challenge faced by Garth Risk Hallberg's first novel, "City on Fire," which, clocking in at more than 900 pages, seeks to re-create, in panoramic fashion, the New York City of the late 1970s. Hallberg's book, of course, is much anticipated, for its length, its scope and its deal (he sold the book for $2 million) — but all of that is beside the point. The only criteria worth considering is whether, or how, the narrative works, the extent to which it draws us in. Read more

Joe Sowerbutts. (CtrlMovie)

Late Shift’

Early in the film “Late Shift,” Matt, a student on his way to a night job, faces an easily relatable dilemma: help a lost tourist with directions and risk being late to work or ignore the man and hop on a waiting subway train. Here is where you would expect director Tobias Weber to show the audience the outcome of Matt’s decision as the story unfolds. Matt’s choice, however, is up to you, the viewer. In fact, you control every major plot turn in the film. “Late Shift,” created by CtrlMovie, a small studio in Switzerland, and written by Weber and Michael Robert Johnson, best known for Guy Ritchie’s “Sherlock Holmes,” may be the world’s first fully realized choose-your-own-adventure film. Read more

Todd Martens

Video game critic

Other recommendations:

A Few New Mobile Video Games

There are a lot of mobile games out there — last year more than 100,000 iOS games were released in North America. Here are a few recent mobile games worthy of exploration: "Love You to Bits" (Alike/Pati). Breakups stink. They're worse when your girlfriend is scattered around the galaxy. In this iOS game a young boy tries to put back together his first love, a female robot, and learns to live on his own along the way. "Story Warriors: Fairy Tales" (Below the Game). Tales such as "Snow White," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Cinderella" and more get remixed in this text-driven puzzler about a young woman who gets trapped in folklore. Tap on words to bring them to life, and piece together nouns and adjectives as if they're math problems, the right solution inspiring a cutesy animated sequence. "SPL-T" (Simogo). Swedish studio Simogo is one of the most adventurous companies out there, specializing in head-scratching, text-heavy games such as "Device 6" and "The Sailor's Dream." "SPL-T" is a back-to-basics puzzle game. In the black and white game, players place a horizontal line and then a vertical one, trying to create as many splits as possible. "Super Phantom Cat" (Veewo). Cats! Robots! "Super Phantom Cat" takes the weirdness of "Super Mario Bros.," gives it a zany feline-meets-sci-fi makeover, and uses slick touch controls to create a freshly retro experience. It's all delivered with a gooey feel-good message and some rainbow-hued prettiness. "The Swords." (Sunhead Games). Imagine a scene in an action movie, one in which one swordsman is surrounded by an army on all sides. Now imagine all the action is presented in a minimal ink wash art style. By zeroing in on the blades, "The Swords" emphasizes the chaos of battle. Swipe fast, and do so with precision. Read more

'Rocket League'

Dave Hagewood didn't set out to create the next big thing in electronic sports. Ten years ago he simply envisioned a game in which cars did crazy things. Cars with rockets on them. The result was the breakout independent game of 2015, "Rocket League." The key to its success was one simple addition to Hagewood's original vision: a giant, bouncy soccer ball. Thus, a zany game in which cars crashed into one another became something else entirely, a madcap sport. "Rocket League" has now reached more than 12 million players, with revenue topping $70 million. In late February, the game — already a hit on Sony's PlayStation 4 and computing platform Steam — arrived on Microsoft's Xbox One, where in less than a month it attracted more than 1 million players. Read more

'Fire Emblem Fates'

In my first 25 hours with Nintendo 3DS' "Fire Emblem Fates," families argued, attempts at flirting were rebuffed and relatives threw a fit over poorly cooked meals. Were it not for the swords and the spells and the half-fox/half-human, the game wouldn't be all that different from the last month or so of my life. Though there is sword and sorcery here, including a main character who has the ability to turn into a dragon, "Fire Emblem Fates" is really about family drama. In this case, it's about the pull of one's blood family versus the connection with an adopted one. Do you help the stepbrothers and stepsisters who always supported you, or the brothers and sisters you've only just met? The player's avatar, which can be male or female, was kidnapped at a young age and raised as a warrior prince/princess. Her (I chose a female avatar and named her Kes) adopted-but-criminal family took good care of her, and it's clear she's tight with her siblings. But her father — a.k.a. the king — is a monster. Read more

'Firewatch'

"Firewatch," set in the quiet Wyoming wilderness, is a game in which its main character does little more than walk. Yet at its heart this is a game about running. It's about running from our pasts, running from our emotional trials and running from the unknown. It's about how avoidance often makes things worse and how the road to conquering our fears can be downright frightening. And things get pretty bad in "Firewatch." Read more

'Leo's Red Carpet Rampage'

Winning an Academy Award, it proves, can be nearly an impossible task, at least according to the lighthearted Web game "Leo's Red Carpet Rampage." The game puts players in control of a mini, vintage-style Leonardo DiCaprio in a quest for an Oscar. And while the game is pure goofiness when it starts — simply mash a couple of buttons to run the red carpet and dodge photographers — it goes dark, and quickly. Read more

(Monica Wang Photography)

Reservoir

Just in time for the holiday shopping season, a new boutique has opened on Robertson Boulevard marrying East and West Coast style. Reservoir is the concept of New York City transplants Aliza Neidich and Alissa Jacob and features a well-edited mix of clothing, accessories and home goods with an easy sophistication made for L.A., including Ryan Roche hand-knit sweaters, Denis Colomb ponchos, Ellery sleek crepe dresses and tops, Solid and Striped denim jumpsuits, Madeworn tees, Newbark shearling slides, Dosa patchwork totes and Wendy Nichol fringed leather bucket bags. Read more

Reservoir, 154 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles

Booth Moore

Fashion critic

Other recommendations:

'Sporting Guide: Los Angeles, 1897'

With famed film mogul Sam Goldwyn as her grandfather, Liz Goldwyn's family name is practically synonymous with old-school Hollywood glamour. But it's Los Angeles before it became the capital of the motion picture industry that's the subject of the style maven's new book, "Sporting Guide: Los Angeles, 1897" (Regan Arts). The work of historical fiction looks back on the city's seedier past, with loosely connected stories about the madams, prostitutes, orphans, hustlers and tramps who roamed Alameda, Los Angeles and Spring streets. I chatted with Goldwyn about what drew her to this time period in L.A., her impressions of the book's rough characters, and what role women had in a culture where prostitution was tolerated. Read more

'Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe'

Ladies, the next time you are teetering on high heels, you can blame men. But not for the reason you think. In Western fashion, high heels were popularized by men, starting in the court of Louis XIV where a talon rouge (red heel), identified a member of the privileged class centuries before Christian Louboutin made red soles the calling card of his luxury shoe brand. That's just one of the tasty tidbits in "Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe," an exhibition scheduled to run through Dec. 13 at the Palm Springs Art Museum that examines the fashion accessory we all love to hate, including its history, its relation to gender identity, sex appeal and power. Read more

Palm Springs Art Museum, 101 Museum Drive, Palm Springs